AQUEOUS

ABSTRACT

ART MIAMI

GAZZETTE REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY

DANIELLE DEGARIE

DOROTA KOZINSKA

DELIRIUMS OF

LÚDICA

LOWES MUSEUM

ERICK ALLEN

FERTILITY DANCES

GALLERY

marianne tolentino

NUDES

ORGANIC FORMS

SCOTT DUPERRON

STEPHEN D.KAPLAN

 

 

LATINAMERICAN ART

LOWE ART MUSEUM

ASPECTS OF LANDSCAPE IN

LATIN AMERICAN ART

DR. EDWARD SULLIVAN

 

Paradise Lost? Aspects of Landscape in Latin American Art, on view at the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, from January 30 - April 6, 2003, represents a panoramic view of Latin American landscape, from 1830 to the present, addressing both regional identity and uniqueness of individual artistic personality, as it explores the visual contributions of Latin America. The Lowe’s exhibition breaks new ground, because this is the first time that an exhibition comprehensively traces, explores, and interprets stylistic, thematic, and iconographic developments in Latin American art of Spanish and Portuguese speaking countries, from historic to contemporary, within the diverse genre of landscape.

OIL PAINTING BY FERNANDO UREÑA RIB

 





Paradise Lost? Aspects of Landscape in Latin American Art
 

Dr. Edward J. Sullivan, New York University



EXHIBITION: Paradise Lost? Aspects of Landscape in Latin American Art organized by the Lowe Art Museum, featuring more than 100 paintings, works on paper, photography, and mixed media/installation pieces by artists representing 20 countries, traces and explores developments in Latin American art, within the diverse genre of landscape, from historic to contemporary.



The exhibition addresses five art historical categories -- travelers; academics; modernity; contemporary classical tradition; contemporary idioms -- through more than 100 paintings, works on paper, mixed media, photography, and video, by 76 acclaimed and emerging artists representing 20 countries. Paradise Lost? is drawn from the Lowe’s permanent collection and augmented with important local, national, and international loans, including the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

In terms of contemporary artistic expressions, nature, or “paradise,” was more often than not a symbol and metaphor for a variety of complex situations never far removed from politics, ecology, or humanism. As Paradise Lost? reveals, early 21st century Latin American landscapes continue to address issues of nature under attack or threatened by violent or ecological catastrophe.

The Lowe Art Museum is Miami-Dade’s oldest visual arts institution and features 5,000 years of world art. For more information call (305) 284-3535 or visit the Lowe’s website at www.lowemuseum.org. Support for Paradise Lost? Aspects of Landscape in Latin American Art, was provided by the Funding Arts Network, Burdines, and the City of Coral Gables. Lowe Art Museum exhibitions and programs are sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Arts Council; the Institute for Museum and Library Services; the Miami-Dade County Cultural Affairs Council and Board of County Commissioners; and the members of the Lowe Art Museum.



 

 

 

 

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