AQUEOUS

ABSTRACT

ART MIAMI

GAZZETTE REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY

DANIELLE DEGARIE

DOROTA KOZINSKA

DELIRIUMS OF

LÚDICA

LOWES MUSEUM

ERICK ALLEN

FERTILITY DANCES

GALLERY

marianne tolentino

NUDES

ORGANIC FORMS

SCOTT DUPERRON

STEPHEN D.KAPLAN

 
 
DOMINICAN ART
 
 

FERNANDO UREÑA RIB

BY DOROTA KOZINSKA

 

 

 

If Fernando Ureña Rib looks very comfortable with his canvases, it is because he has been painting since a very early Age. Born in La Romana, Dominican Republic in 1951, This International artist began his Art training at 12, graduating with a degree of Professor of Art from the National School of Fine Arts in Santo Domingo in 1968, followed by Art Studies in Europe and the U.S.

Ureña Rib has seen his work exhibited around the World. He holds a prominent position on the Art scene in his own country since 1968. He is drawn to Montreal annually, where he rents a studio in the Belgo Building of the downtown area. There he immerses himself enthusiastically in the creative and diverse atmosphere of Montreal producing here his works.

The result of his latest prolific output is a series of paintings titled Carnavalia now on display at the Dominican Republic Tourist Board offices on Crescent Street. Ureña Rib creative flow is broken into two distinct currents, each powerful in its pull, but marked by different visual aesthetics.

Many years ago he drove the attention of Art critics with his sensual, organic, Abstract Paintings of unique and beautiful sensibility, blossoming against the backdrop of contemporary art galleries in a powerful explosion of color and form. However, Ureña Rib is primarily a lover of the human body, the female in particular, and the nude is recurring theme in his production. It is also the focus of his latest series, as the artist continues to explore the many facets of human anatomy.

¨I have been attracted to the female form since I can remember ¨ he said. " It is not just the female body. It is the interest in and the discovery of the possibilities of movement of the human body>"

In his canvas, nude female figures overlap in a continuous dance, the image fragmented by the folding of space and time, lines upon lines, a tangle of limbs and faces, a vibrating, shimmering mosaic of color planes. Basing his pictorial exploration on the Greek philosopher Heraclitus's assertion that all things are happening at the same time , he attempts to re create his seemingly impossible vision of simultaneousness.

The result is series of rhythmic figures, beautiful nude bodies of idealized women, serene beings of mythical rather than human proportions.

Nymphs inspire these stylized females, a symbol of the Forces of nature and the Feminine power.

"I want these paintings to symbolize the power of woman. Not just political power, but all the power they possess." said Ureña Rib. Not just political power, but all the power she possess. As in Tantric Buddhism, he is seeking the elusive mix between spirituality and sensuality. The idealization of the form - all figures in Ureña Rib are of perfect proportion- is aimed as pleasing the eye, and the models chosen for the portraits are invariably young and lithe.

Taking advantage of the proximity of several contemporary Dance studios housed in the Belgo building where he paints, Ureña Rib often uses dancers to pose for him, their muscular bodies perfectly suited to carry his visual message.

Adorned with colourful and fantastic headdresses, these women participate in a magical carnival. They appear in a variety of compositions: in groups of three or more, at times resembling the same figure in a kaleidoscope of movement, at other a gay crowd partaking of a sacred ceremony.

Renouncing contemporary Art's preoccupation with intellectual Angst- which he sees as the residue of post World War nerves- Ureña Rib aims to create beautiful, pleasing images. An excellent colorist, he constructs a rich surface, a pattern of overlapping colors in perfect visual harmony. "I do not thing there should be a divorce between Art an Beauty," he asserts. " In this century, the concept of beauty is seen as poisonous, but I think we are arriving at a point where that is going to be changed, soon.

 

 

 
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